All posts by Andrew Powell-Morse

airbrake-devops

What is DevOps?

DevOps is the practice of combining the philosophies and tools of software development (Dev) and software operation (Ops). The term was first introduced during the 2008 Agile Toronto conference by developers and technologists Patrick Debois and Andrew Shafer. Yet, as with many relatively new technological terms thrown around the industry,… continue reading →

Java Exception Handling

Java Exception Handling – SocketTimeoutException

Making our way through our in-depth Java Exception Handling series, today we’ll be going over the SocketTimeoutException. As you may suspect based on the name, the SocketTimeoutException is thrown when a timeout occurs during a read or acceptance message within a socket connection. Throughout this article we’ll explore the SocketTimeoutException… continue reading →

dotnet Exception Handling

.NET Exceptions – System.Deployment.Application.DeploymentException

We finish up the current run of our detailed .NET Exception Handling series with a dive into the System.Deployment.Application.DeploymentException. The DeploymentException is actually a larger parent class to all exceptions that occur during deployment. For example, using the common ClickOnce method of application deployment might run into some issues, and… continue reading →

software methodology

How Your Software Methodology Affects Production Behavior

Dozens of development methodologies have popped up over the relatively few decades in which modern software development has taken place. Each method provides its own benefits and challenges throughout the software development life cycle, but it can be particularly difficult to determine how your software methodology affects production behavior of… continue reading →

Java Exception Handling

Java Exception Handling – UnsupportedOperationException

Making our way through our detailed Java Exception Handling series, today we’ll dive into the UnsupportedOperationException. The UnsupportedOperationException is used by a number of built-in Java methods to indicate that the method in question is not currently implemented. This is functionally similar to exceptions found in other languages, such as… continue reading →